Tenerife South: They Call Me Mellow Yellow

“Oop pardon me sweetie. HEY SHERRY MOVE! SHERRY! MOVE! BAHAHAHA SHE WANTS TO GET BACK IN,” the boisterous, shrill voice of the woman flapping at her friend standing in the aisle granted me just enough of a gap to squeeze by, hop across J’s lap and into my seat. My opinion of the gaggle of ladies next to us was torn. They had brought the party to the plane. I definitely admired their ability to drink, shriek and guffaw for the entire four hours of the flight, but their party hour exuberance was wearing thin. Continue reading “Tenerife South: They Call Me Mellow Yellow”

10 Things I Have Learned About Spain And Spaniards

The murmur from the streets slipped into the house as J and I stepped out under the stars. The soft orange light from the street lamps failed to mask the night sky completely. Under the glow the streets were awash with activity. Neatly dressed women glided by behind baby-carriages. Their laughter mingled with the boisterous discussions sounding out from the tables scattered about the main street. Savory food hissed on grills every few meters.

El Rompido glimpsed during the day looked like a ghost town—but as the cool air of the night began to settle in everyone spilled out of their homes and the village was reborn.  Without fail I was amazed by the transformation of this small seaside village each and every evening. Continue reading “10 Things I Have Learned About Spain And Spaniards”

Eating and Dancing in Cambridge’s Streets

Boom! Rattatate, rattattate, rattattate! Boom. Boom. Boom! Rattatate, rattattate, rattatate.

I found my head nodding in time to the energetic beat as it reverberated against the houses. Nabbing my boyfriend, J’s, hand as we crested a bridge I set us on course for the source of the sound. We dodged and gently nudged our way through the wall of people listening to the music.

Mill Road had gone from channeling a stream of cars to bursting with a river of strolling revelers. It was the Nile in flooding season. The local shops and international stores joyfully slurped up passing folk—their wares sparkling under the attention. Other islands of sound and bobbing bodies stood against the flow of curious incoming visitors. You never knew what you were going to float past next!

Continue reading “Eating and Dancing in Cambridge’s Streets”

Cameron Highlands, Malaysia

When we arrived in the Cameron Highlands it was dark. The dashboard clock of my friend’s little red car flashed 11 p.m. As a driver my eyes had been fixed on the curving, swirling, serpentine road. Now demoted to passenger I was free to admire the slashes of light in the distance. What were they anyway?

Continue reading “Cameron Highlands, Malaysia”

The Picky Eater Guide to Thailand

So, I’m a picky eater. At home in Canada my diet pretty much consisted of original chips, some kind of ham/pepperoni/ sausage and cheese combination and a need to avoid the veggies unless they are on their own. Translation: basically a happy carnivore.

Continue reading “The Picky Eater Guide to Thailand”

Nan, Nan, Thailand

Where were we? We weren’t sure, but something about a waterfall.

“The sign says the temple is this way,” shouted my Japanese friend pointing up a paved, steep winding road.

“Let’s go then,” was my response as I twisted the throttle and tapped the motorbike into gear.

We pulled ourselves to the top, but no peaked roof peaked through the trees, no paths lead to a temple entrance. We continued down the road and found ourselves looping right back to the entrance.

So we changed our objective.

“The sign says the market is this way,” my Japanese friend once more pointed the way.

“The sign says the waterfall is down that way.”

“The woman said we should go that way to find the waterfall.”

Before we knew it the road had faded into a dirt track.

Continue reading “Nan, Nan, Thailand”

Phare: The Cambodian Circus, Siam Riep

The chair across from me sat empty. The pile of fries on the small table would be mine alone to tackle. Glancing at the young couple giggling to my left, the older couple softly talking in front of me and the family with three children to my right before circling back to my fries, I dug in. My hand looped from mouth to plate in a continuous track with only a pit stop for some ketchup en-route. Continue reading “Phare: The Cambodian Circus, Siam Riep”

Death Railway: Kanchanaburi

To recap, a group of 14 and I left Bangkok on a bus aiming for Kanchanaburi on a Saturday at 7 a.m. When we arrived two hours later we immediately boarded a bus headed for Erawan National Park and its famous seven falls. After hours of fun there we found ourselves without transport back to town—with no seats left the last bus was obviously full. We were forced to squeeze onto that bus and stand in the aisle all the way back.

Learning our lesson and following the advice of fellow students met at the falls we aimed for a set of guest houses called Sugar Cane and Jelly Frog as soon as we disembarked from the bus in Kanchanaburi. Our party swept into a two-bench taxi called a songthaew and we haggled for a ten baht per person price.

Continue reading “Death Railway: Kanchanaburi”

Kanchanaburi and Erawan Park

You’re an exchange student with no to very-little money or even student debt that you don’t want to deepen. Yet, you’re in another country and you don’t want to waste the opportunity. Continue reading “Kanchanaburi and Erawan Park”

Student Life: Thailand

สวัสดี Sawadeekha (not spelled correctly but that is how you pronounce it)

I’m now in Thailand! I’m from Canada so adjusting to the heat has been a challenge at times but doable.

For the most part it has been the humidity that I’ve found most noticeable. I feel like I’ve run a few kilometers when I’ve just walked a few minutes. I also drink a lot more water now. Before coming to Thailand I scoured the Internet for tips and suggestions.

Continue reading “Student Life: Thailand”